Monitoring atmospheric composition & climate
 
 
Summer School 2013

Online lecture series on the Earth'€™s atmospheric composition and Copernicus Services for Atmosphere

MACC-II, the European project in charge of developing the range of services of the Copernicus programme on the composition of the Earth's atmosphere organised a Summer School in June 2013 for the purpose of training users of the services, as well as future users of the services and young scientists and engineers.

A prestigious set of speakers delivered lively presentations on the key current aspects of this scientific field as well as important background information on the range of services that Copernicus delivers.

Atmospheric composition is at the cross-roads of important environmental topics our society is facing and MACC-II brings today this series of talks to you. Have you ever dreamt of having Michael Schumacher as driving instructor? You will now be able to learn more about air quality, greenhouse gases, climate forcers, aerosol or the ozone hole by some of the key European scientists in the field.

1. An introduction to atmospheric chemistry (part 1)

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Prof. Paul Monks (University of Leicester, United-Kingdom)

Duration: 55:57

All you ever wanted to know about the fate of chemical compounds in the atmosphere! No need to be an expert in chemistry to understand more about the processes that rule the composition of the atmosphere and the manifold impacts of its chemical constituents. This movie is the first part of the series of two talks.


2. An introduction to atmospheric chemistry (part 2)

Prof. Paul Monks (University of Leicester, United-Kingdom)

Duration: 1:03:50

All you ever wanted to know about the fate of chemical compounds in the atmosphere! No need to be an expert in chemistry to understand more about the processes that rule the composition of the atmosphere and the manifold impacts of its chemical constituents. This movie is the second part of the series of two talks.

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3. Ground-based observations

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Dr. Liisa Jalkanen (World Meteorological Organisation, Switzerland) Duration: 1:00:23

Observations are critical for our knowledge of the short, medium and long-term evolution of the composition of the Earth atmosphere. Measurements from the ground, both by in-situ and remote-sensing devices, have been historically the main source of observational information. Today, they are still a critical element of our observing capability providing in general observations with higher sensitivity and precision than what is attainable from space but sparsely distributed over the globe.



4. Satellite observations (part 1)

Prof. John Burrows (University of Bremen, Germany)

Duration: 46:21

Observations are critical to our knowledge of the short, medium and long-term evolution of the composition of the Earth atmosphere. For the past three decades, satellite observations have provided unique insight on atmospheric composition complementary to other measurement types. Learn how satellites 800 km above our heads help investigate a number of current issues regarding air quality and climate. This movie is the first part of the series of two talks.

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5. Satellite observations (part 2)

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Prof. John Burrows (University of Bremen, Germany)

Duration: 1:02:50

Observations are critical to our knowledge of the short, medium and long-term evolution of the composition of the Earth atmosphere. For the past three decades, satellite observations have provided unique insight on atmospheric composition complementary to other measurement types. Learn how satellites 800 km above our heads help investigate a number of current issues regarding air quality and climate. This movie is the second part of the series of two talks.



6. Atmospheric composition modelling (part 1)

Prof. Guy Brasseur (Climate Service Centre, Germany)

Duration: 1:04:52

Mathematical models are key tools that are used both to advance our understanding of atmospheric physical and chemical processes and to provide forecast information, just like for meteorology. What are the underlying principles? How do they work? What are their limitations? These are among the questions covered. This movie is the first part of the series of two talks.

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7. Atmospheric composition modelling (part 2)

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Prof. Guy Brasseur (Climate Service Centre, Germany)

Duration: 59:46

Mathematical models are key tools that are used both to advance our understanding of atmospheric physical and chemical processes and to provide forecast information, just like for meteorology. What are the underlying principles? How do they work? What are their limitations? These are among the questions covered. This movie is the second part of the series of two talks.



8. Aerosol modelling (part 1)

Dr. Nicolas Bellouin (University of Reading, United-Kingdom)

Duration: 59:42

Aerosols are microscopic particles in the air emitted by both natural and anthropogenic sources. They are also formed in the atmosphere. Their representation in numerical models is a challenge because their size and chemical composition vary significantly in space and time through a number of complex processes. Accounting for aerosols is currently a significant challenge both for air quality and climate modelling. Come and get some insight on one of the hottest topics in Earth sciences! This movie is the first part of the series of two talks.

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9. Aerosol modelling (part 2)

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Dr. Nicolas Bellouin (University of Reading, United-Kingdom)

Duration: 58:25

Aerosols are microscopic particles in the air emitted by both natural and anthropogenic sources. They are also formed in the atmosphere. Their representation in numerical models is a challenge because their size and chemical composition vary significantly in space and time through a number of complex processes. Accounting for aerosols is currently a significant challenge both for air quality and climate modelling. Come and get some insight on one of the hottest topics in Earth sciences! This movie is the second part of the series of two talks.



10. Emissions

Dr. Claire Granier (CNRS, France)

Duration: 54:11

Chemical compounds are emitted into the atmosphere by a number of sources, both natural and resulting from human activities. Quantifying the emissions is essential to assess their impacts on atmospheric composition, meteorology and climate. Mapping emissions and evaluating their uncertainties in an international and collaborative context is among the building blocks of the IPCC.

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11. Emissions of aerosol

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Dr. Cathy Liousse (CNRS, France)

Duration: 52:20

Aerosol emissions deserve a full lecture! As for modelling, the intrinsic complexity of aerosol makes the characterisation of their varied sources very challenging. Being at the heart of air quality and climate questions, quantifying regional and global sources and characteristics of aerosol emissions is currently a crucial issue. How can this be done? Get some insight in the current research and open questions on aerosol emissions.



12. Inverse modelling (part 1)

Dr. Frédéric Chevallier (CEA, France)

Duration: 57:00

Inverse modelling is a term that groups a number of mathematical techniques that allow inferring information on parameters and quantities that are not directly observed, but are linked via a model to observations. In the context of atmospheric composition, it principally refers to estimating surface fluxes (emissions and/or deposition) of constituents using observations in the atmosphere. Sit back and learn how these very powerful techniques work... This movie is the first part of the series of two talks.

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13. Inverse modelling (part 2)

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Dr. Frederic Chevallier (CEA, France)

Duration: 1:04:16

Inverse modelling is a term that groups a number of mathematical techniques that allow inferring information on parameters and quantities that are not directly observed, but are linked via a model to observations. In the context of atmospheric composition, it principally refers to estimating surface fluxes (emissions and/or deposition) of constituents using observations in the atmosphere. Sit back and learn how these very powerful techniques work… This movie is the second part of the series of two talks.



14. Global MACC-II products and their evaluation

Dr. Henk Eskes (KNMI, The Netherlands)

Duration: 1:04:01

MACC-II delivers a number of information products on global atmospheric composition. What are these products? How are they produced? How do we estimate their quality and the associated uncertainties? This lecture covers these aspects, which are essential for the current and future users of Copernicus Atmosphere Services.

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15. Regional Air Quality MACC-II products and their evaluation

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Dr. Virginie Marécal (CNRS/Météo-France, France)

Duration: 54:20

MACC-II delivers information products on European Air Quality. What are these products? How are they produced? How do we estimate their quality and the associated uncertainties? This lecture covers these aspects, which are essential for the current and future users of Copernicus Atmosphere Services.



16. Environmental legislation in Europe in the field of Air Quality

Dr. Laurence Rouïl (INERIS, France)

Duration: 1:01:47

Poor Air Quality affects health and ecosystems and is therefore regulated at international, European and national levels. Improving Air Quality by reducing anthropogenic emissions is often associated with significant costs and identifying optimal benefit/cost solutions is essential for being able to implement policies that are affordable and efficient. What are these regulations? How will they evolve in the coming years? Will Air Quality in Europe improve in the future?

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Additional material from the MACC-II June 2013 Summer School